Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall & Denver Moore, a review

Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall & Denver Moore with Lynn Vincent
Published 2006 by Thomas Nelson, 235 pages

Ron Hall’s flirtation with the wealthy lifestyle leads him down the path of infidelity. His wife, Debbie, forgives him, and together they embark on a new project of her choosing–ministering to the homeless in Fort Worth, Texas. Ron, an international art dealer, finds himself serving food every Tuesday at a mission.

Debbie’s had a dream about a homeless man who is, in the words of Ecclesiastes, “A wise man who changes the city.” She points out the man to Ron–a tall taciturn, angry black man. Befriend that man, she tells him.

So he tries his best. That man is Denver Moore, an illiterate 60-year-old who had left virtual slavery as a Louisiana sharecropper in the 1960s, escaping to the relatively better state of being homeless in Fort Worth. After 30 years on the streets, he’s learned to protect himself by a cloak of anger.

How do Debbie and Ron tame the wild man? And, once he’s tamed, how does Denver Moore help Ron through the most painful event in his life?

They make an odd couple now, the multimillionaire art dealer and the humble illiterate former bum. Their friendship is a wonderful thing, a God thing. And the story is all true.

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