The Fifth Man by John Olson and Randy Ingermanson, a review

Someone seems to be bent on killing them, and they don’t know who it is. Is there a murderous fifth man on Mars?

Light of Eidon by Karen Hancock, a review

Abramm is calling himself Brother Eldrin, and all he wants is to be left alone by his family. But his family isn’t happy about it, not the least because it’s the royal family, and he’s now second in line to the throne. Soon Abramm discovers that the holy orders that have been his life for the past eight years are a front for evil people who want to use him as a puppet.

Firebird by Kathy Tyers, a review

Lady Firebird Angelo was born the third daughter of the queen of her world. That sounds like she might have had an easy life. But the warped rules on her planet dictate that she must die as soon as she drops down to fifth in line to the throne. It’s not just those in the royal family; this happens to the heirs of all the major houses on her planet. She’s a “wastling,” born to be wasted. Her time comes, and Firebird, a pilot, is sent on a suicide mission along with other wastlings. But her enemy saves her life. What can she do now?

Book of Days by James L. Rubart, a review

Cameron Vaux has lost both his father and his wife, Jessie. Now he fears he’s losing his mind, the same way his father’s mind went, one memory at a time. He latches onto an idea mentioned by both his father and Jessie: God’s book holding all memories. Problem is, Cameron doesn’t believe in God.

The Hunger Games movie

My friend Jim Tudor watched the Hunger Games movie with no expectation. Here’s his take on the movie:

The Hunger Games, a review

Katniss Everdeen, a 16-year-old living in America some time in the future when it has devolved into a cruel empire, loves her little sister more than anything. So when that little sister is chosen for the Hunger Games, Katniss doesn’t hesitate. She takes the sister’s place. She finds herself fighting 23 other teens to the death in a high-tech arena, for viewing pleasure in the ultimate reality show. Only one person can win, and that winner gets plenty of income for life, unlike everyone else in the conquered territories–who is starving or nearly starving.

Peril: A Fast Track Thriller by Suzanne Hartmann, a review

Joanne’s an Illinois homeschooling mom struggling with the fact that her husband is losing a battle with cancer. She’s a survivor herself–she recovered from paralysis, thanks to an experimental adult-stem-cell treatment. Her family’s future looks uncertain, but she tries to trust God about it.

Softly and Tenderly by Sara Evans with Rachel Hauck, a review

Jade lives in Tennesse in a small town dominated by her in-laws, under pressure to get pregnant from her lawyer husband. But she keeps having miscarriages. Then she finds out her in-laws’ marriage is a wreck under the surface. Her husband tries to beat his addiction to perscription pain killers. Her mother, who has come to stay with her, is dying of leukemia. It sounds like she’s living a Southern soap opera.